Child Custody

Child Custody

Negotiation Whenever Possible

Successful Child Custody Arrangements Are Possible

Families change, but there are strategies to lessen the impact of a break up on children.  Parental attitudes directly affect children during a divorce.

The child’s best interests direct well crafted custodial orders.  California law balances two goals: First, ensuring “frequent and continuing” contact of the child with both parents. Second, safeguarding the “health, safety and welfare” of the child.  When these goals conflict, the safety of the child prevails. 

Child custody disputes can cause the most anxiety in a break up.  Your spouse may employ scare tactics as a manipulation strategy.  If so, consult an experienced family law attorney immediately.

The term “Physical Custody” concerns where children spend their time.  “Legal Custody” allows for decision making for the child (such as school selection).  Custody orders can be joint (both parents) or sole (to one parent alone).

Speak To Us Today






What should you tell a custody attorney during a consultation?

  • Has any Court already made custody orders?  If so, try to bring them to the meeting.

  • Are there present safety concerns?  Drugs, Alcohol or Criminal Activity?  Should a Domestic Violence Restraining Order be considered?

  • Does your child have special needs?

  • What do you believe is in your child’s best interests? Do you have a proposed custody plan?  Does your child express a clear desire (for whatever reason) to live with one parent over the other?

  • How well do you and the other parent communicate?  Are both parents able to put the needs of their children first over their dislike for each other?

  • Do you trust the other parent with the children?

  • What are your immediate and long-term housing goals?  Will you be living near the other parent?  Does one of you plan on relocating (with or without the children)?

  • Do you anticipate (or want) the children to change their current schools?  Does your employment situation allow you to transport the children to and from school?  If not, what is your plan for school days?

  • How were the parenting tasks naturally divided while the parties lived together?  Which parent prepared meals, bathed the children, read them stories, played with them, put them to bed, supervised homework, coached teams, etc.?

  • Which parent has attended parent-teacher conferences?  Who attends pediatrician and dental appointments?  How well do you know your child?  Do you know the names of your child’s teachers and best friends?  Do you know their clothing and shoe sizes?

  • Do you have different parenting approaches?  Do you discipline differently?  Is one of parent a “spoiler” and more of a friend than a parent?  Does one parent disparage the other parent in front of the children?

  • Does your family have special holiday or vacation traditions that would effect a custodial schedule?

Our Client's Reviews

  • Kelly B.

    Hughes Law Group helped me through a horrible divorce.  Helped me to stand up for what was right for my children.  They are very knowledgeable and ethical.  I highly recommend Hughes Law Group.